Horse Farm General Planning

Before you buy your dream horse farm, stop and do some planning.

Before you buy your dream horse farm, stop and do some planning.

So You Want a Horse Farm: Part 1 – General Planning

The key to owning and running a successful, hassle-free horse farm is planning. So before you buy property to build your dream farm, or before you purchase a property with horse amenities in place, let’s stop and think about what will make your farm run as smoothly as possible and give you the greatest enjoyment.

There are several key areas you need to consider. In today’s blog, we’ll talk about planning what you want to do with your horse farm.

Set Your Goals

First, start by imagining what you want to do with your farm. Are you clear on the type of operation you want to have? Are you raising Thoroughbreds, training dressage horses, or teaching reining? Will you run the operation yourself, or will you have a crew to maintain the horses, facilities, and property?

Match Location to Your Goals

Then determine if the geographic area you have chosen is suitable for that breed and discipline. Location is important for any business, and it’s important even if your horse farm is for pleasure. You have a much better chance of success (and enjoying your property) if you locate your horse farm in an area where the climate, terrain, and support industries are conducive to the type of farm you want to buy or build. (We’ll talk about the environment for your horse farm in the second part of this series.)

The key to owning and running a successful, hassle-free horse farm is planning.

Support industries include such services as veterinarians, farriers, and feed suppliers who are familiar with your breed or discipline and can cater to their special needs. Also, you need to consider whether there are competitions and/or sales for your breed or discipline within a reasonable transporting distance from your farm. You don’t want to build the nicest farm in the world that is 1,000 miles from the nearest event center for your discipline.

Consider the Lifestyle and Community Around You

If you are going to live on this farm, hopefully it is in a community or area where you want to live. Make sure to check out the lifestyle and community (schools, shopping, entertainment, etc.) to ensure you will be as happy as your horses.

In our next blog we’ll talk about environment and suitability for your horse farm.

Feel free to send your questions to me at Ron@EquineManagement.com and I’ll try to address them in future blogs.